The Netflix Queue: Leverage

It’s so rare these days to come across a TV show that ends when it should’ve. So often, shows will continue as long as they’re making money, and more often than not that means we get a season or two (or more) near the end that most fans just prefer to ignore. Just as often, we’ll get a show cancelled before its time, ending on a cliffhanger that will never be resolved, leaving fans frustrated and bitter.

Leverage is one of those preciously rare shows that falls into neither trap. It’s five seasons long, five glorious seasons, and while the end may leave you wanting more, it’s still an extremely satisfying ending that is well worth the watch.

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The Netflix Queue: Voltron: Legendary Defender

Voltron: Legendary Defender I never really watched the original ’80s Voltron, being as that it first aired the year I was born. So I didn’t even realize that Netflix was doing a reboot until my roommate—who did watch the original cartoon—told me about it and said, “Hey, I think you’d really like this.”

Being as that I love both science fiction and giant robots, I was more than happy to give it a watch.

Spoiler alert: Roommate was right. I ended up absolutely adoring the show.

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Movie Review: Assassin’s Creed

Assassin's Creed posterIt’s probably a surprise to no one that Assassin’s Creed (based on a very good series of games) was…well, “meh” is really the best word for it. It had some great action and some very nice visuals, but that’s about the best that can be said for it.

It’s a bit of a shame, because the cast—Marion Cotillard, Michael Fassbender, Charlotte Rampling, Jeremy Irons, and Brendan Gleeson, to name a few—is a very solid one, and you’d expect them to be able to give their characters a bit more depth. But, sadly, there’s nothing really there to work with, so while they do a fair job with what they’ve been given, the end result is still flat.

The plot was interesting, to be sure. It’s set in the same world of the video games: there are two factions, the Knights Templar and the Assassins, and each is trying to prevent the other from finding a particular artifact called the Apple that holds the key to free will (yes, really). There is a massive corporation called Abstergo that has developed a piece of technology called the Animus, which allows them to put a person into it and have them relive the lives of their ancestors through genetic memory.

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Movie Review: Rogue One

rogue-one-posterFirst things first: If you go into Rogue One expecting something just like the episodes, you will probably be disappointed. Rogue One is not like the episodes. It’s definitely a darker, more adult film (not really with regards to violence, which is about the same as the other movies, but with regards to themes).

It is, however, a fantastic movie and I loved it.

I knew going in that it was going to be about a group of rebels conspiring to steal the Death Star plans. What I didn’t expect was how far they would have to go and how far they were willing to go to do it. Rogue One has more about how the Rebellion actually functioned in its operation than what we’ve seen previously, and shows how fractured the Rebellion itself actually was.

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Movie Review: Hidden Figures

hiddenfiguresposter If you were wondering how they would possibly make a movie about math interesting, let me tell you: when people’s lives hinge on getting the math exactly right, then you will also be on the edge of your seat, hoping the problem gets solved in time.

That’s basically the big crux of Hidden Figures: finding the correct equations that will allow NASA to compute the precise trajectory to get a man into space and bring him back again without setting the pod on fire or sending it careening off back into space.

But the math is just the plot. The story itself is about the unsung heroes of NASA, the black women who did the calculations that made the flights possible in the first place. These “colored computers,” as they were called, were some of the most brilliant mathematicians at NASA. Hidden Figures focuses on three in particular: Katherine Johnson, Dorothy Vaughn, and Mary Jackson.

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